MANAGERISM

The Managerism initiative promotes responsible and accountable business leadership: it is a private, independent, open and non-commercial project -- started and supported by a network of individuals. It offers an alternative German/Austrian perspective on management topics and the matrix business/economics/society.

Please note: The following are English translations of essays from our German website www.managerismus.com

 

 

NEW CONTRIBUTIONS

 

Lesson Number 27― Now online!

Business Strategy ― What are the Learnings of J. Welch and M. Porter?

For a long time these men represented the non plus ultra of corporate leadership and business strategy. So what is left after the hype? Do their teachings still pass a reality check? This lesson gives the answer ― from a professional. Also, why management gurus are bad for your health. More 

 

Lesson Number 46 

RELECTURE 5: Karl Raimund Popper — "All Life Is Problem Solving"

Philosophical, Ethical and Practical Ideas for Management: Karl Popper was probably the most wide-ranging philosopher of the past century. Ever since his youth he addressed social and political questions. In his famous book The Open Society and Its Enemies (1945) and subsequent works he analysed the nature of democracy and its aberrations. Austrian-born Sir Karl Popper — unlike his German contemporaries — advocated simplicity and clarity. He made it his duty to speak and write as clearly as possible. The code of professional ethics that he formulated for responsibles in politics, society and administration, and thus indirectly also for managers, is of timeless validity. More

 

Executive Pay: Ackermann, Winterkorn and the Jealousy Factor

Günter Ogger on the capping of executive compensation: It was nice to hear that Bernd Osterloh wants to cap the pay of his bosses at VW. But is the Chairman of the Works Council really the right person for this? Members of the works council acting as moral apostles, in particular at VW, has been tried before — and it came to nothing. More

 

Lesson Number 42 

General Electric (GE): Back to Basics

Until recently, GE was the star of progressive corporate leadership and was much admired, especially by the capital markets. Now things have fundamentally altered. So new conclusions must be drawn about corporate leadership, also in Europe, and especially by GE’s rival Siemens. More

 

Lesson Number 43 

Big Company Disease

Corporate obesity is a real disease. It affects mega-companies who have grown too big and are no longer efficient or innovative. They choose a strategy of growth to reap the supposed benefits of scale and synergies. But without proper entrepreneurship, big is not better it is "badder". More

 

Lesson Number 39 

RELECTURE 4: Joseph A. Schumpeter – Preceptor of Change

Schumpeter is renowned as the economist who invented the expression "creative destruction". Schumpeter ranks, together with Keynes, as the outstanding economist of the 20th century. But what do we really know about this multi-faceted economist: of his disjointed life or comprehensive analyses of entrepreneurship and the dynamics of the market economy?  More

 

Lesson Number 25 

RELECTURE 1: Konrad Lorenz and The Eight Deadly Sins of Civilized Society

Forty years after the publication of his best seller we recall the insights on human development of this legendary scientist. The 'Father of the Grey Geese' was not only a universal scientist of animal behavior, he was also a keen observer of humanity and societies. Here we reconsider Konrad Lorenz's perspectives, especially on economics and politics. More

 

Thinkpiece Number 9 

McKinsey – the Insider Company

Abuse of trust is always shameful, wherever and whenever it happens. But there are different degrees of abuse. It is especially scandalous when leaders of organizations are involved: trust abused by those claiming to be custodians for their clients. Take a look at this hidden, unbelievable story.  More

 

Thinkpiece Number 10 

Directors' Pay – Something Has To Change

Directors' pay is in the headlines. It should remain a matter of social and political concern until things change. Why? What needs changing? Local and contemporary issues are important ― but this perspective covers more. More

 

Lesson Number 33 

The Powerful Management System of the Biggest "Hidden Champion" in the World

The term "hidden champion" is a title of distinction. There are many hidden champions in Germany, more than any other country — many are small or mid-sized enterprises (Mittelstand) often located well away from major cities. Another hidden champion, a really huge one, Koch Industries, is headquartered on the Great Plains in Kansas, USA. Charles G. Koch, son of the founder, and present CEO, developed a theory of human action based on ideas from the Austrian School of Economics: Ludwig von Mises, Friedrich A. von Hayek and Joseph Schumpeter. This Lesson offers a unique insight into Koch's thinking and beyond. More

 

Abbreviated version of Thinkpiece No. 13

Innovation Weakness: An Existential Challenge Especially for Large Companies

 

Lesson Number 30 

RELECTURE 2: Viktor Frankl ― A Great Human Being and Questioner of Meaning and Responsibility

What kind of a man was it who, after surviving the horrors of Nazi death camps, was able to advocate conciliation? What teachings of this great psychotherapist are still relevant for our day and age which he predicted so well? What lessons can we learn from Frankl about leading our lives and companies? More 

 

Abbreviated version of Thinkpiece No. 11 

Value Extraction or Value Creation

Two opposing economic practices:  Contrasting a value extracting economy with a value creating one illustrates the difference between a distorted market economy and a more desirable, responsible market economy. More

 

Thinkpiece Number 8

The Industrial Decline of the USA – Lessons for Europe

Can America re-industrialize? It is doubtful whether it can, even if, for the first time in decades, industrial jobs were a topic in a presidential election campaign. This overview by Manfred Hoefle explains the remarkable decline of the US production sector, and why it is difficult to reverse the trend. What lessons can Europe learn from the US experience? More 

GE learns the German way – a belated insight

The Wall Street Journal (March 7, 2012) came up with the headline New GE Way: Go Deep, Not Wide. After several decades, General Electric (GE) has ended the practice of job rotation — or job hopping every two years — for future top executives or 'high potentials'. This also marks the end of GE's omnipresent short-term thinking, at least in this respect. More